Difference between revisions of "Eight worldly preoccupations"

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The '''eight worldly concerns''' or samsaric dharmas (Tib. ''‘jig rten chos brgyad'') are where all one’s actions are governed by: hope for happiness and fear of suffering, hope for fame and fear of insignificance, hope for praise and fear of blame, hope for gain and fear of loss; basically attachment and aversion.
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The '''eight worldly preoccupations''' or '''samsaric dharmas''' (Tib. འཇིག་རྟེན་ཆོས་བརྒྱད་, ''jikten chö gyé'', [[Wyl.]] ''‘jig rten chos brgyad'') are where all one’s actions are governed by:  
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*hope for happiness and fear of suffering,  
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*hope for fame and fear of insignificance,  
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*hope for praise and fear of blame,  
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*hope for gain and fear of loss;  
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basically attachment and aversion.
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They are mentioned in verse 29 of [[Nagarjuna]]'s ''[[Letter to a Friend]]''.
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==Alternative Translations==
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*eight worldly concerns
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*eight mundane obsessions
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*eight worldly dharmas
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==External Links==
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* {{LH|tibetan-masters/nyala-pema-dundul/advice-on-abandoning-the-eight-worldly-concerns|''Advice on abandoning the eight worldly concerns''}} by [[Nyala Pema Dündul]]
  
 
[[Category:Enumerations]]
 
[[Category:Enumerations]]
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[[Category:08-Eight]]

Latest revision as of 16:45, 16 August 2018

The eight worldly preoccupations or samsaric dharmas (Tib. འཇིག་རྟེན་ཆོས་བརྒྱད་, jikten chö gyé, Wyl. ‘jig rten chos brgyad) are where all one’s actions are governed by:

  • hope for happiness and fear of suffering,
  • hope for fame and fear of insignificance,
  • hope for praise and fear of blame,
  • hope for gain and fear of loss;

basically attachment and aversion.

They are mentioned in verse 29 of Nagarjuna's Letter to a Friend.

Alternative Translations

  • eight worldly concerns
  • eight mundane obsessions
  • eight worldly dharmas

External Links