Patrul Namkha Jikmé

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Patrul Namkha Jikmé, according to Matthieu Ricard

Patrul Namkha Jikmé (Tib. དཔལ་སྤྲུལ་ནམ་མཁའ་འཇིགས་མེད་, Wyl. dpal sprul nam mkha' 'jigs med) aka Padma Khalong Yangpa Tsal and Tulku Namkha Jikmé (1888-1960) of Dzachukha was a son of Dudjom Lingpa and of Akyabza Kalzang Drönma [1], and a reincarnation of Patrul Rinpoche.

Birth, Family, Recognition

Birth & Family

Patrul Namkha Jikmé was the seventh son of Dudjom Lingpa. His direct brothers are Tulku Lhatop and Tulku Dorje Dradül.

Prophecy

In his outer autobiography, Dudjom Lingpa recounts how he was told by his primary protector that Patrul Rinpoche will reincarnate as one of his sons[2]:

In 1887 [while I was 53], I gave teachings in Bochung Tashul’s home. During this time I wondered, “Is my homestead well?” Nöjin Shenpa Marnak, Dark Red Noxious Spirit Butcher, appeared in a dream one night. […]. [He] arrived in front of me proclaiming, “If you have something you don’t know or understand, I will tell you all about it. I asked, “Is my family well?” He told me, “They are well. This year Palgé Tulku, Glorious Virtue [Patrul Rinpoche], is going to come again.” I said, ‘Ah, Palgé Tulku has passed away. He’s not here.” “He passed away, and he’s not here, while at the same time he will appear once again. In the last autumn month you’ll meet him.”

Recognition

Patrul Namkha Jikmé was recognised by Dza Tsamtrul Rinpoche Kunzang Dechen Dorje (Pema Kunzang) and Dudjom Lingpa as an incarnation of Patrul Rinpoche, and enthroned at Dzagyal Monastery, in Dzachukha, where his previous incarnation had formerly resided, and where he went to live.

In his outer autobiography, Dudjom Lingpa recounts how he was foretold by a dakini precisely when he had to let his son be enthroned at Dzagyal Monastery[3]:

In the year I turned fifty-seven [1891], at night on the fifth day of the second month, a dakini called Zulu Men sang to me,
In the first autumn month of this year
Some people will appear from the highlands:
They will come to invite Palgé Tulku [Patrul Namkha Jikmé]]
Such envoys will twice arrive—
Until the Sheep Year is underway
It’s not the time to enthrone him.
The Mamos and the Dakinis will postpone the event until then.
Do just as the envoys request.
Since it is of great significance, don’t refuse them.
If there’s any way he can be granted the investiture on the throne,
He will be capable of working for the welfare of beings.

In his outer autobiography, Dudjom Lingpa recounts moving to Dzagyal Monastery for the enthronement of his son[4]:

[In 1895, when I was 60], our tent encampment moved to Dzagyal Monastery. I was greeted there by a procession of monks playing musical instruments and then [my son] Patrul Namkha Jikmé was granted investiture on the throne. I gave teachings from the middle winter month until the middle spring month. At the latter part of the middle spring month, we moved our tent encampment once again, to a valley called Tri-barma.

Training

Patrul Namkha Jikmé’s two main teachers were his father Dudjom Lingpa, and Khenpo Kunpal. He revealed nine volumes of terma, and constructed a shedra at Dza Pukhung Gön and a Zabchö Shitro Gongpa Rangdrol drupdra at Dzagyal Monastery.

Writings

  • tshig gsum gnad du brdeg pa'i spyi 'grel de kho na nyid gsum gsal ba'i rgyan

Students

Among Patrul Namkha Jikmé’s main students are:

  • Chad lo Tsering, Khen Sherab
  • Dungsé Kunzang Lungtok Pelgyé Pal Zangpo
  • Khandroma Kunzang Wangmo
  • Khen Bumdar
  • Khen Gyurme Namgyal
  • Khenpo Petse Rinpoche aka Khen Padma Tsewang Lhündrub, referred to as the Chödak Lobmé Tsok
  • Khen Sönam Tsering
  • Lama Kündar
  • Longs Chö
  • Lungzin Tenpai Saljé
  • Remo Kunzang Wangmo
  • Sherab Mebar

His main dharma heir was his own daughter, Khandroma Kunzang Wangmo, a great-daughter of Dudjom Lingpa.

Notes

  1. Akyabza Kalzang Drönma was the third consort of Dudjom Lingpa, and also the mother of Tulku Lhatop and of Tulku Dorje Dradül.
  2. Dudjom Lingpa, ‘A Clear Mirror’, The Visionary Autobiography of a Tibetan Master’, The Outer Autobiography, translated by Chönyi Drolma, Rangjung Yeshe Publications, 2011, page 169-170.
  3. Dudjom Lingpa, ‘A Clear Mirror’, The Visionary Autobiography of a Tibetan Master’, The Outer Autobiography, translated by Chönyi Drolma, Rangjung Yeshe Publications, 2011, page 174.
  4. Dudjom Lingpa, ‘A Clear Mirror’, The Visionary Autobiography of a Tibetan Master’, The Outer Autobiography, translated by Chönyi Drolma, Rangjung Yeshe Publications, 2011; p.189.

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